Never get complicit

D

Deletedmember

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One for those training to join paras here:

been complicit the last 2 weeks not training eating bad etc. Went on a 8k run today, which is usually a nice comfortable run, felt sick after. Lesson learnt for me. If your feeling down or not up for it just keep at it.
 

Colgate

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Motivation is very important especially on the harder days. That’s why I’ve literally wrote my end goal down and stuck it on the inside of my wardrobe.
Which is a place I see everyday. Having a clear vision of why you are doing it will help mate.

BTW- I think you mean compliant ! !
 

Aldo

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For me it’s all about sticking to good habits. Takes discipline but I know it’s 100% guarantee that I ultimately feel better after a good session no matter how little I want to do it.
 

Snows

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Motivation is very important especially on the harder days. That’s why I’ve literally wrote my end goal down and stuck it on the inside of my wardrobe.
Which is a place I see everyday. Having a clear vision of why you are doing it will help mate.

BTW- I think you mean compliant ! !
I think he means Complacent.

Complacent = getting too comfortable and slacking
Compliant = obeying the rules
Complicit = aiding and abetting a crime or bad behaviour

You can all tell your English teachers that I take cash, bank transfer, or PayPal.
 

LLB

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It comes down to successfully structuring your routine. There is a thread on that here that you may find handy
 

PhysMan

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On the one hand I don't remember the last time I wrapped on training, in all honesty phys is my main hobby, but on the other hand I think I can give some advice all the same for keeping up that routine.

Make sure you always do something/do 'anything' if it is a training day on your timetable.

By that I mean, whilst we ideally would have the self-discipline to stick to exactly what session we've planned, and you really should be trying to do that, it's still more beneficial to be doing "fun phys" than "no phys" if you are feeling particularly out of touch with your routine or goals.

Before the gyms closed again I was burning the candle at both ends in some ways, trying to run 35 miles per week and also trying to do a lot of strength training in the gym. It was basically a marathon programme in the AM and a Strongman programme in the PM. Some days I simply didn't have the energy or desire to absolutely end myself. But rather than take a day off, which can fairly quickly grow into 2 or 3 days off, next thing you know you've had a week off, I'd give myself a 'free fun session'. If I wanted to do some vanity training, a couple of bicep curls or using a bodybuilding machine, then I would just to break up that routine a little bit. Likewise as a runner, sometimes you've got a 5 mile Fartlek session planned but your body just isn't responding at all, so you decide "ok, I'll just make it a 5 mile easy run for today and catch it up soon in another session".

In no way am I encouraging taking the easy route, or constantly wrapping on your phys. Quite the opposite, to stimulate change we NEED to be pushing beyond our comfortable limits, recovering, then pushing limits again and again and again and again. However, everyone is starting from a different point. If you're at a point where you still struggle to maintain a constant thrashing programme then it is definitely better to do some enjoyable phys than none at all.

The same advice goes if you're still particularly young or far off applying. If you're reading this as a 14 or 15 year old who plans to join at 18+ then, whilst I do think you should be doing some runs and circuits (look up "General Physical Preparedness"), you'll be in a much better position to jump into a hardcore phys programme down the line if you just make a habit of being active for now. Lockdown permitting, get out and play a sport, do a bit of swimming, just be a generally fit and active person, and when the time comes to get more specific then you can switch to a military training programme.
 

PhysMan

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One for those training to join paras here:

been complicit the last 2 weeks not training eating bad etc. Went on a 8k run today, which is usually a nice comfortable run, felt sick after. Lesson learnt for me. If your feeling down or not up for it just keep at it.

To add to my last comment, @Decwba18 I see you had a few dramas at Assessment Centre because of the bleep test. In all honesty you NEED to be making running a regular part of your routine.

I've said it again and again on this forum but I'll mention it now in case it's been missed - look up 80/20 running. This will completely change your life as a runner. So many people, particularly those quite new to running, associate it with just being constant suffering. Committed runners will tell you the opposite and talk about how enjoyable it is. That's because they've learnt how to pace themselves and get the most out of their sessions. What 80/20 means is 80% of your runs should be EASY. The science suggests you pretty much can't go "too slow" on these easy runs. You should be able to hold a fairly normal conversation at easy pace. Or to scale it 1-10 in terms of difficulty it should feel like about a Level 3 at most. The other 20% of your runs should be HORRENDOUS. Absolutely max effort, whether that's a 2km test or a sprints session, you should be pushing up to that Level 9 or 10 of difficulty. Break the maths down even easier - if you run 5 days per week then 4 runs should be slow and easy and 1 should be fast and hard. What this means is you can fit in more mileage without burning out. You don't damage the muscles as much so you can recover quicker. Faster recovery = safely able to run a lot more often = more time physically spent doing that cardiovascular exercise which develops the heart and lungs. 80/20 training is how the top marathon runners and sprinters alike all train for a reason.

I have a strong feeling mate that if you start making a habit of doing lots of slow and steady runs, just 1 per week where you completely destroy yourself, you will find it much more enjoyable sticking to that routine and subsequently that bleep test and 2k score will massively improve.
 
D

Deletedmember

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To add to my last comment, @Decwba18 I see you had a few dramas at Assessment Centre because of the bleep test. In all honesty you NEED to be making running a regular part of your routine.

I've said it again and again on this forum but I'll mention it now in case it's been missed - look up 80/20 running. This will completely change your life as a runner. So many people, particularly those quite new to running, associate it with just being constant suffering. Committed runners will tell you the opposite and talk about how enjoyable it is. That's because they've learnt how to pace themselves and get the most out of their sessions. What 80/20 means is 80% of your runs should be EASY. The science suggests you pretty much can't go "too slow" on these easy runs. You should be able to hold a fairly normal conversation at easy pace. Or to scale it 1-10 in terms of difficulty it should feel like about a Level 3 at most. The other 20% of your runs should be HORRENDOUS. Absolutely max effort, whether that's a 2km test or a sprints session, you should be pushing up to that Level 9 or 10 of difficulty. Break the maths down even easier - if you run 5 days per week then 4 runs should be slow and easy and 1 should be fast and hard. What this means is you can fit in more mileage without burning out. You don't damage the muscles as much so you can recover quicker. Faster recovery = safely able to run a lot more often = more time physically spent doing that cardiovascular exercise which develops the heart and lungs. 80/20 training is how the top marathon runners and sprinters alike all train for a reason.

I have a strong feeling mate that if you start making a habit of doing lots of slow and steady runs, just 1 per week where you completely destroy yourself, you will find it much more enjoyable sticking to that routine and subsequently that bleep test and 2k score will massively improve.
Yeah mate theres so many different advice to running im trying to just cram it all in and probably not enjoying it as much as a would. Dont get me wrong i do love that feeling after a run especially after a run where the first 10 minutes you want to quit but you keep pushing for the next 20. Just need to plan it out. I dont wanna keep harpin on but what does your training consist of cos you seem to be at a high level of fitness.
 
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