Weighted vest

Joe-Singh

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Recently purchased a weighted vest, used to do abit of tabbing (8-12miles, 15-26kg) with a ex-ranger I used to live in a hostel with, my initial plan is to implement walks into my routine, about an hour or so 2/3 times a week, I would like to slowly incorporate weighted runs, I know AFCO advise against this, due to the higher likelyhood of injury, just looking for advice and tips on the safest way to utilize the best without causing injury.
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Tony_m

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Apparently these are great at improving pull ups and press ups. But don’t fucking break yourself. Train in a safe manner. You don’t need to be superman to start Depot. Just fit, healthy and bags of willing.
The closest I got to this was when I used to run in the old webbing with weights in each pouch. Train hard, fight easy and all that. But mostly I just stuck to the old basics of running, press ups and sit ups without any extra kit!
 

Joe-Singh

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So recommend no running, not even with only 3/4 kg added? It's adjustable, if not I'll keep it to calisthenics and walking
 

Mac_t1lt

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I wouldn’t run with it one bad twist and you’ll tear your meniscus. Use it for press-ups, Sit ups and pull-ups
Second that. I’ve found progressive adaptability far better and safer than just whacking on weight and running. My vest took some getting used to, after my first run my lower legs and hips where blown to shit. Now I just use it for footwork drills, pushups, etc; the things mentioned above. If you’re going to run in it go for a lower weight. 20kg is a bit mad to run with
 

Redders

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Second that. I’ve found progressive adaptability far better and safer than just whacking on weight and running. My vest took some getting used to, after my first run my lower legs and hips where blown to shit. Now I just use it for footwork drills, pushups, etc; the things mentioned above. If you’re going to run in it go for a lower weight. 20kg is a bit mad to run with

That is ideal. Joe are built up progressively to run/double with weight. If you arrive injured you may end up med discharged
 

Mac_t1lt

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That is ideal. Joe are built up progressively to run/double with weight. If you arrive injured you may end up med discharged
Talking of injuries. Im at a point in running at the moment where I’m very injury prone. New shoes incoming. You advise I pack running in for a couple weeks to fully heal? I don’t want to lose the fitness I’ve earned over the last year but I don’t want ANY pre-existing issues in the slightest either. Pickle
 

Redders

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Talking of injuries. Im at a point in running at the moment where I’m very injury prone. New shoes incoming. You advise I pack running in for a couple weeks to fully heal? I don’t want to lose the fitness I’ve earned over the last year but I don’t want ANY pre-existing issues in the slightest either. Pickle
100% rest it or risk blowing something out. Instead focus on no impact cross training, swimming, rowing, cycle and your run times shouldn’t take too much of a hit.
 

Redders

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Also High-intensity interval training. Shame pools aren’t open as pool running is low impact and a great session. Sprinting in chest deep water will activate all the same muscle groups. Also use this time to get stronger. when your body gets stronger, your able to absorb the force you create while running,so you feel stronger and can run more easily
 
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Mac_t1lt

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Also High-intensity interval training. Shame pools aren’t open as pool running is low impact and a great session. Sprinting in chest deep water will activate all the same muscle groups. Also use this time to get stronger. when your body gets stronger, your able to absorb the force you create while running,so you feel stronger and can run more easily
You’re a hero Redders mate 🤝🙏 I’ve done very well getting myself to a certain standard. With help from the PTIs I’m adamant I’ll exceed the standards required. Top advice again bud cheers 🏆
 

Dot

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Second that. I’ve found progressive adaptability far better and safer than just whacking on weight and running. My vest took some getting used to, after my first run my lower legs and hips where blown to shit. Now I just use it for footwork drills, pushups, etc; the things mentioned above. If you’re going to run in it go for a lower weight. 20kg is a bit mad to run with

Mate @PhysMan was talking about this the other day. I’ve tagged him so he will see this! What you done to yourself? Hope you heal up soon mate
 

Mac_t1lt

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Mate @PhysMan was talking about this the other day. I’ve tagged him so he will see this! What you done to yourself? Hope you heal up soon mate
Nothing too hideous mate just nags and niggles that come from pounding cement solidly over a year with nothing else around it. I essentially tried to become a pro runner and made the mistake of excluding other vital aspects of training which would’ve limited injuries / prevented them all together. I recommend plate carriers and weight vests as additional tabbing weight or for soft workouts but defo nothing over 5k unless youre bricks or made from rubber. As I’m a tad older I’ve gotta train smart now, and trying to smash out 22minute 5ks with additional weight - untrained - is a no go.
 

Joe-Singh

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Definitely not trying to run with 20kg on me, that's something the ex-ranger would do on our tabs, he used to do PT for his recce platoon, always found it abit mad, no matter how many weeks he took off he'd always be able to get a few miles in without issue
 

PhysMan

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Mate @PhysMan was talking about this the other day. I’ve tagged him so he will see this! What you done to yourself? Hope you heal up soon mate

Seen! I initially didn't comment and just "liked" several posts in the thread as they're exactly what I'd have said.

Weighted vests are great for calisthenics (press-ups, pull-ups etc) but I'd avoid running in them for any of us still preparing to join.

On the other hand, probably great to run with occasionally as a trained rank in any force or late-training reservist, once the body is adapted. I know I used to run in one once I was in commando phase of RMR training but that was years ago and I now won't run with weight again until I'm doing it under control in the military soon, as no matter how fit I am for a civvy I'm not adapted to military phys, and neither are almost any of us civvy candidates.
 

Snows

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Also High-intensity interval training. Shame pools aren’t open as pool running is low impact and a great session. Sprinting in chest deep water will activate all the same muscle groups. Also use this time to get stronger. when your body gets stronger, your able to absorb the force you create while running,so you feel stronger and can run more easily
Got there before me, exactly this. Learned this from a physio when I was running injured years ago first training. When the world opens up again if anyone tries this, get some ankle or other weights to keep you down, because the problem tends to be floating up more than anything else.

Also, @Joe-Singh to slightly sidestep the running with weight issue, which I know splits people - I fall on the side of it's valuable to do, because it's activity-specific training, but you also should be aware that any running with weight damages you (even when you are in). So you minimise it and do it efficiently. As such, keep the weight lower than that (absolute max 20kg, and I'd recommend no more than 10kg), and the ground you do it on soft - remember the impact equation isn't just weight, it's about shock, which is substantially affected by the ground you are on. Concrete is worst, tarmac is bad, trails are ok, short grass is good, heather is best. If you are in a city, the difference between running in the park on the tarmac path and the grass/mud trail beside it is substantial. I'd also recommend training with a daysack rather than a vest, because although in the field weight is carried and distributed by armour, you are training for P-Coy, where it is carried in a bergan. So your purpose for training with weight is to develop your core, back and shoulders, and a vest doesn't distribute it that way.

Ultimately just be aware, this will be you in X years, the point is to make X the largest number you can:

pain-is-weakness-leaving-the-body-unless-of-course-you-6906709.png
 
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Joe-Singh

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Got there before me, exactly this. Learned this from a physio when I was running injured years ago first training. When the world opens up again if anyone tries this, get some ankle or other weights to keep you down, because the problem tends to be floating up more than anything else.

Also, @Joe-Singh to slightly sidestep the running with weight issue, which I know splits people - I fall on the side of it's valuable to do, because it's activity-specific training, but you also should be aware that any running with weight damages you (even when you are in). So you minimise it and do it efficiently. As such, keep the weight lower than that (absolute max 20kg, and I'd recommend no more than 10kg), and the ground you do it on soft - remember the impact equation isn't just weight, it's about shock, which is substantially affected by the ground you are on. Concrete is worst, tarmac is bad, trails are ok, short grass is good, heather is best. If you are in a city, the difference between running in the park on the tarmac path and the grass/mud trail beside it is substantial. I'd also recommend training with a daysack rather than a vest, because although in the field weight is carried and distributed by armour, you are training for P-Coy, where it is carried in a bergan. So your purpose for training with weight is to develop your core, back and shoulders, and a vest doesn't distribute it that way.

Ultimately just be aware, this will be you in X years, the point is to make X the largest number you can:

pain-is-weakness-leaving-the-body-unless-of-course-you-6906709.png
Appreciate that mate, given I've already got a meniscus tear from a few years back it's definitely will be me, at the moment I've kept it to weighted walks, to increase my work capacity and overall endurance, as I do feel it is valuable, but if/when I get to running with weight I'll be starting with just a few kg on grass playing fields, have used a Bethan in the past, but using sandbags as weight, the Bergen would bounce off my back, so I stopped that didn't want to do more damage than it worth
 

Snows

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Appreciate that mate, given I've already got a meniscus tear from a few years back it's definitely will be me, at the moment I've kept it to weighted walks, to increase my work capacity and overall endurance, as I do feel it is valuable, but if/when I get to running with weight I'll be starting with just a few kg on grass playing fields, have used a Bethan in the past, but using sandbags as weight, the Bergen would bounce off my back, so I stopped that didn't want to do more damage than it worth
Building up slowly from minimal weight is the way to go. Make sure that whatever pack you use is fully packed out and not loose with empty space, with lightweight soft stuff at the bottom, and heavy stuff at the top around your shoulders. Have the shoulder straps pulled tight, and preferably tape up the excess from the straps so they can't loosen too much. That should stop the bouncing. Chest straps are not, in my opinion, very useful as you don't use them for real. Wearing the pack should pull your shoulders back a little, which opens your chest. That distribution will develop the muscles you need correctly.

Also, when I say "run with weight", don't fix on the word "run". You need a pace of 10 minute miles over rolling hills. Some do that at a fast march, some short-arses run the whole way, most combine the two (obviously on P-Coy you go at the pace of the DS, which is combining the two). Experiment to find what works best for you. Broadly you can't go wrong running on the flat and downhill and marching uphill. However you do it, remember the aim is the minimise effort, not max it. Watch experienced DS and they have a standard shuffle that isn't lifting the feet much (therefore minimising impact) or expending much energy. Tabbing is a method of travel, not a race to the finish!
 

Joe-Singh

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Thank Snows that sounds like brilliant advice, to be honest I've generally wrapped up a sandbag or two and gone on the tabs in the past, with minimal running as I was trying to put out too much, I'm still slowly working my load capacity up at the moment, but I will try this out with a Bergen soon!
Edit:I have a waist strap on my Bergen, do you think this would be useful? Or better off without? Generally I've used it in the past but tend to loosen it up when breathing heavier
 
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Snows

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Thank Snows that sounds like brilliant advice, to be honest I've generally wrapped up a sandbag or two and gone on the tabs in the past, with minimal running as I was trying to put out too much, I'm still slowly working my load capacity up at the moment, but I will try this out with a Bergen soon!
Edit:I have a waist strap on my Bergen, do you think this would be useful? Or better off without? Generally I've used it in the past but tend to loosen it up when breathing heavier
Without. Regardless of the pros and cons of waist and chest straps, look at all the pictures of P Company. Nobody wears them. Also, patrolling SOPs, you'll never wear them (although adding armour distributes weight differently). Straps are great for racers or general civvy use, but they aren't specific training for what you want to do.

The most efficient military way of carrying weight is actually the Gurkha headband version. But you won't be doing that, so it's not useful to train that way. The only point of training with weight is to develop the specific muscle groups that support carrying weight that way: to do that you need to carry it the way you will for real.
 
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