What are the hills like in training

Newt

Member
Joined
Jan 25, 2021
Messages
47
Reaction score
19
What are the hills like where you do your PT and the 4 miler on PRAC
 

Snows

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 2, 2021
Messages
147
Reaction score
483
Catterick hills are short but steep. Not the same as fell running etc, which are long inclines at varied gradients. Hill sprints are good preparation for Catterick hills, but won't do you much good in the Lake District or Wales, for which you need technique and endurance quad / glute exercises.

There is also a major difference between any hills with weight, and without, which I've seen some people get wrong. Ideally your technique without weight is on the balls of your feet and picking up your knees, like a dressage pony. Your ankle angle (angle between your foot and shin, how far you extend your calf muscles and Achilles) remains at 90 degrees or greater. This requires a lot of calf strength to stay bouncy, but you can run largely from the calves and glutes.

That's not possible with weight. Instead you need to drive uphill with your whole foot and heel on the ground, while the ankle angle is less than 90 degrees because of the incline of the slope. This means you are driving more from your quads, and it requires a lot of Achilles flexibility due to the increased angle at the ankle, or you'll get injured. Stepup exercises with a dropped heel (you touch the step with the ball of your foot and allow the heel to drop, which extends the Achilles) and squats are good for developing this, as well as a dedicated stretching program to develop your Achilles flexibility (which is just normal Achilles stretches, just more of them, more often, and hold the stretches for longer).

Running on hills with/without weight is almost a whole separate sport, like the difference between velodrome and Tour De France.
 

Dickie

Member
Joined
Nov 25, 2020
Messages
12
Reaction score
18
53gvbg.jpg
 

Sam W

Para Reg
Joined
Mar 26, 2021
Messages
10
Reaction score
30
Even in battalion you will be smashed on various hills. For ex Reg lads here I have two words - Friday Woods.

Every Friday morning for CO’s PT we used to crack a four-mile best effort booted run that included charging through a freezing, swollen river, through a flooded marsh and up and down every hill that could be included in the route. Beautiful scenes.
 

G87

Para Reg
Joined
Feb 3, 2021
Messages
39
Reaction score
62
Even in battalion you will be smashed on various hills. For ex Reg lads here I have two words - Friday Woods.

Every Friday morning for CO’s PT we used to crack a four-mile best effort booted run that included charging through a freezing, swollen river, through a flooded marsh and up and down every hill that could be included in the route. Beautiful scenes.
Let’s not tell them about the art of shelling/being shelled
 

HP

Para Reg
Joined
Feb 16, 2021
Messages
60
Reaction score
95
Catterick hills are short but steep. Not the same as fell running etc, which are long inclines at varied gradients. Hill sprints are good preparation for Catterick hills, but won't do you much good in the Lake District or Wales, for which you need technique and endurance quad / glute exercises.

There is also a major difference between any hills with weight, and without, which I've seen some people get wrong. Ideally your technique without weight is on the balls of your feet and picking up your knees, like a dressage pony. Your ankle angle (angle between your foot and shin, how far you extend your calf muscles and Achilles) remains at 90 degrees or greater. This requires a lot of calf strength to stay bouncy, but you can run largely from the calves and glutes.

That's not possible with weight. Instead you need to drive uphill with your whole foot and heel on the ground, while the ankle angle is less than 90 degrees because of the incline of the slope. This means you are driving more from your quads, and it requires a lot of Achilles flexibility due to the increased angle at the ankle, or you'll get injured. Stepup exercises with a dropped heel (you touch the step with the ball of your foot and allow the heel to drop, which extends the Achilles) and squats are good for developing this, as well as a dedicated stretching program to develop your Achilles flexibility (which is just normal Achilles stretches, just more of them, more often, and hold the stretches for longer).

Running on hills with/without weight is almost a whole separate sport, like the difference between velodrome and Tour De France.
Great post and so true. If you aren’t already start doing hill sprints, it will help condition you. Steep incline and max effort sprint up, burpees at the top then jog down and repeat. Treat yo self
 

Dot

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 23, 2020
Messages
149
Reaction score
90
Do you ever do PT with recruits joining other infantry units and how do the Para Joe compare ?
 

G87

Para Reg
Joined
Feb 3, 2021
Messages
39
Reaction score
62
Are other capbadges mixed together?
Yep and the instructors too. Whereas with us you will only be trained by experienced Paratroopers hence the higher quality as they know exactly what they want going to battalions
 

Apex303

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 28, 2021
Messages
36
Reaction score
63
Do you ever do PT with recruits joining other infantry units and how do the Para Joe compare ?
Your fitness sessions will be as a platoon. But depends where you are and what you're doing as your platoon might be sharing a space with another. For example the outdoor pitches would sometimes have a few platoons doing a session.

The sessions are hard but rewarding. Plus you'll have corridor.

You can have a glance and see the difference for yourself (don't let your corporal see as they will probably thrash you and ask if you want to go over and join them instead) but honestly there is a difference.

If you struggle with phys, just call the PTI mate and he'll give you more. Sorted.
 

Snows

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 2, 2021
Messages
147
Reaction score
483
Jungle Warfare Instructors Course consisted of much more tabbing up hills in 30 degree heat and 90% humidity than it did instruction.
"Like" seemed inappropriate, so I went with "Angry". I've done constant exposure to both -50 and +50, but the only two times I've been put on my arse were ~0 degrees + windchill having been soaked through for days, and +26 degrees with 90% humidity. Given a choice, I'd take +50 dry heat over cooking in my own skin in high humidity and half the temperature. Utterly gopping.

Being wet will kill you quicker and at more moderate temperatures, every time. This is why, for the potential recruits, you'll all get the intense pleasure of morning wet/dry drills in depot.
 
Top